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The Dixons - A Colonial Quaker Family

Another son of William Dixon and Ann Gregg Dixon Houghton was John. John's brother Henry built the Dixon-Jackson House. John built a home around 1732 west of Henry's home. This home, now known as the Dixon-Wilson House, is on Valley Road southwest of Henry's house.

The home has a dat...

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Henry Dixon, son of the immigrant William Dixon, purchased two hundred acres in Mill Creek Hundred in 1726, at the age of 34. He built a one-room log house on his property in what is now northern Delaware. When he passed away in 1742 it was inherited by his son, Samuel Dixon, who later sold i...

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[Revised July 1, 2018]

The Dixons seemed to have one thing in common: every couple of generations they got the urge to explore, to move to the frontier and stake their claim on uninhabited land. William’s parents or grandparents certainly did so, most likely as part of King James’ Plantation o...

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[Edited July 1, 2018]

As the self-designated family genealogist I am keenly aware of how quickly the information of past generations can be lost. I am so thankful that my mother started interviewing relatives and taking notes when I was just a child. Most of the people she talked to are now de...

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[Revised July 1, 2018]

My original idea below has been superceded by the following:

  1. I am now using WikiTree for all my online genealogy. It has connected me to other Dixon genealogists more than any other source. It solves two problems - finding other fellow researchers and having a way to...

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